ASSIGNMENT 5: A Personal Project – Tutor Feedback

This morning, when opening my email, I found my tutor’s feedback from Assignment 5.  This document can be found under the Tutor Feedback tab of this site, under the heading Assignment Five: A Personal Project.

I have been feeling quiet apprehensive about this; assignment five is the biggest assignment I have completed to date, where I have conducted the most amount of research and seen the biggest change of direction within my photography.  It appears that this assignment has been well received, and the work I conducted has paid off; I am sitting here with quiet a large grin on my face.

My tutor has made two significant comments.

The first surrounds three of the images discarded from the assignment:

Shoes

Shoes

I called the first image shoes; I really do like this photo, in fact it was one of the first scenarios I had when deciding on what I wanted to capture for the assignment.

My reason for discarding this image, I preferred the juxtaposition of Watching You and I thought that by including both would show too many images of the same ilk.  My tutor said of this image:

Shoes – again this shows the connection between what happens at the temples and the everyday occurrence that this becomes.  I love the abundance and variety of shoes left discarded in this space.

And I must say that I agree 100% with her statement. 

The second image is titled A Walkers Rest.

A Walkers Rest

A Walkers Rest

Here my tutor mentions that the image gives the impression of a park, which may be why I discarded it, and in hindsight that probably is why this was one of the images I decided to let go from the original offering.

There really is nothing wrong with the shot, it is well composed and fits within the contemporary theme of the assignment, but when compared to the other images included in this body of work, it feels a little flat and worth too much explanation to be included as one of the final fourteen.

The final image my tutor liked from my discarded batch was this one of a simple temple alter that I stumbled upon by chance while researching this assignment.

Temple Alter

Temple Alter

Built into the side of the mountain, around a natural source of water, this temple is a pure gem and somewhere I could visit time and again.

I imagine that this place is very old and that the modern buildings sharing this Temple site have grown up and around the cave over many years.

 

This has a fair amount of significance, has been captured in nice detail and may be worth including.

Perhaps I should have included this image as my first image of the assignment, but as it is of a Shrine’s alter over an effigy of The Buddha I decided against its inclusion, but felt that it needed mention in my assignment due to the significance of it being a simple dwelling where one can practice ones faith over the more grandiose structures more commonly seen within Buddhism today.

As mentioned, these images were not discarded because I did not like them, but because I felt that the fourteen I chose were more significant to the assignment.  Having only a limited amount of images to be included in our work, I often struggle making a choice of what stays and what goes and this is why I include a disregarded images section at the end of my submission, so that the shots are still displayed and receive the viewing I feel they deserve.

In her summary, my tutor also mentioned that to build on the work contained within my learning log, I should include a commentary on the relevant practitioners that influenced my assignment theme.  I therefore need to go away and conduct a little more research on the likes of Day and Goldin and to understand why their work stood out for me.

So, once again I have received positive feedback against my work and I seem to understand contemporary photography far more than I realised.  Now it is time to put this hard work to practice and to continue growing within my photography.

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