Getting Creative with Images

Before embarking on the next exercise, I decided to do a little Internet research into creative interpretation, and although this sounded easy enough, I struggled a little to find what I was looking for.

There are lots of images online that depict black and white, monochrome and even sepia, but as we will be dealing with this during the last section of this module, I wanted to find something a little different.  Although, some of the sepia images I found were quiet stunning, and I felt that this image of the Manhattan Bridge and Skyline really stood out from the crowd.

Manhattan Bridge by Anon.

Manhattan Bridge by Anon.

I like the composition of this shot, with the bridge cutting through the middle of the frame and the buildings at the bottom grounding things.  I also like how some of the illumination is ‘blown out’, which really extenuates the dynamic range, making the dark areas within the frame really stand out.  I would imagine, looking at the way the lights twinkle that this was taken on quiet a long exposure, using a very narrow aperture; this would also account for everything being so crystal clear as you move through the frame. It would be very interesting to see the histogram for this shot; I would imagine that it is U-shaped.

Following on from this, I started looking for colour and how changes could be made to give an image a completely different look.

Night Owl by B. Trein

Night Owl by B. Trein

This photo of an owl, which has been coloured blue, is really quiet funky and I love how the orange eyes balance well within the differing shades and tones of the shot.

Of all the images I looked at, I think this is probably the most extreme, and quiet an unbelievable colour cast – this does not mean that it is not an interesting shot though, and one that really gets one thinking about what could be achieved during this exercise.

Another very extreme photo is this one of a sunset (or sunrise) over waves as they lap the shore.

In Purple by Andry122

In Purple by Andry122

I know that the colours in this image are not really in line with what is usually seen, but I watch a lot of science fiction, and this shot could easily come from one of these shows/films; from an alien planet that boasts a purple moon!

While doing my research, I found that the colour purple is a common colour to use when altering how an images colour cast looks.

The final image I found was this one of a sports car, which unfortunately I do not know the name of and I would suspect, is actually grey in colour.

VA7 by Anon.

VA7 by Anon.

This is a very cleaver manipulation of the colour cast, and it suites the subject matter really well.

Of all the images I looked at, this one (apart from the image of the Manhattan Bridge) is the most aesthetically pleasing and works the best overall; it is a good example of interpretative processing.

In order to get to grips with some of the functionality I will use in Photoshop, I have also taken the time to read through my ‘A Photographer’s Guide to Photoshop’ so that when I am ready to start my work, I am not spending too much time understanding the programme and can spend more time working on the exercise.

I am glad I took the time to conduct this mini exercise into interpretative processing and although my examples show the extremes in which this process can be taken, it has given me an understanding of what can be achieved and some ideas on how to conduct this exercise. FOX and CARUANA (2012 p.11) state that:

Researching a project is as challenging and exciting as taking the photographs, sometimes more so.  It frames, informs and focuses the final photographic images.

And I can relate to this, as I am now quiet fired up and looking forward to working through the actual exercise.

Source:

Reference:

Andry122.  (2008) In Purple [Online Image].  Available at: <http://browse.deviantart.com/art/In-Purple-77559498&gt; [Accessed 17 July 2013].

Anon.  (2011) Manhattan Bridge [Online Image].  Available at: <http://www.toile-photo.eu/category/couleurs/sepia/&gt; [Accessed 17 July 2013].

Anon.  (2010) Knocking Down Workflow Roadblocks [Online Image].  Available at: <http://software.intel.com/sites/billboard/article/adobe-creative-suite-has-been-rewritten-todays-powerful-mutli-core-systems&gt; [Accessed 18 July 2013].

Digital Camera.  (2012) A Photographer’s Guide to Photoshop.  Bath: Future Publishing Limited.

Fox, A., Caruana, N.  (2012) Behind the Image: Research in Photography.  London: AVA Publishing SA.

Trein, B.  (2009) Night Owl [Online Image].  Available at: <http://my.opera.com/bentrein/albums/showpic.dml?album=667375&amp;picture=9364249&gt; [Accessed 17 July 2013].

Bibliography:

Digital Camera.  (2012) A Photographer’s Guide to Photoshop.  Bath: Future Publishing Limited.

Fox, A., Caruana, N.  (2012) Behind the Image: Research in Photography.  London: AVA Publishing SA.

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